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Denise Mitchell
Denise Mitchell
Sinn Féin
Party 4


Incumbent :

Main message to voters:

Denise’s policy priorities are fighting against rising homelessness, spiralling insurance costs, an out of control trolley crisis and the wave of gang crime endangering our communities.

Election history:

First elected to Dublin City Council in 2014 and to the Dáil in 2016, Denise has been a local community activist for many years.

Priorities:

  1. We will deliver homes - introducing the largest public housing programme in the history of the State - building 100,000 homes over 5 years.
  2. We will tackle the health crisis, opening 1,500 beds and hiring thousands more nurses and deliver 12 million home help hours to clear the waiting list
  3. We will deliver for workers and hard pressed families – by abolishing the USC on the first €30,000 earned, saving workers up to €700 per annum.

Candidate positions on the election issues:

Taxes and Spending

The government should prioritise putting money aside for future challenges (e.g. Brexit) rather than putting it back into the economy now

The government now takes in more money than it spends. Some argue that this should be set aside to prepare for shocks like Brexit or a sharp reduction in corporation tax revenue. Others argue that the priority should be putting money into the economy through higher public spending or tax cuts.
Agree
Neither agree nor disagree
Disagree
No opinion/skip
Comment:
"Ireland is in the grip of a crisis in health, housing, and so much more. While global challenges are always a risk, the Irish people are suffering now. Our children are growing up in hotel rooms, our older people are languishing on trolleys. "
1 of 27 questions

When there is scope for tax cuts or public spending increases, what should be done?

During the recession, new taxes were introduced and public spending was cut. Some argue that when possible, the government should cut taxes to put money back into people’s pockets. Others argue that the priority should be to increase public spending in areas such as housing and health.
Significant tax cuts
Some tax cuts and some increases in spending on public services
Significant increase in spending on public services
No opinion/skip
Comment:
"The only way to address the issues in health and housing is a massive commitment to public investment; build homes, open beds. "
2 of 27 questions

Should taxes on lower earners (below €35,000) be increased or decreased?

Currently, people earning under €16,500 do not pay income tax. People earning over that pay the standard rate of 20%. There is also the Universal Social Charge: those earning under €13,000 are exempt, while those earning up to €20,000 pay up to 2%, rising to 4.5% for earnings over that amount.
Increased
Stay the same
Decreased
No opinion/skip
Comment:
"In the past, we have had Governments for the wealthy, Governments for the privileged, Governments for the property developers, Governments for the banks. Sinn Féin believes that it’s time that we had government for the people."
3 of 27 questions

Should taxes on middle earners (€35,000-€70,000) be increased or decreased?

The standard rate of income tax is 20%, which applies to all income up €35,300 (for a single person); earnings above that are taxed at 40%. The Universal Social Charge is 4.5% on income between €20,000 and €70,000.
Increased
Stay the same
Decreased
No opinion/skip
4 of 27 questions

Should taxes on high earners (over €70,000) be increased or decreased?

The standard rate of income tax is 20%, which applies to all income up €35,300 (for a single person); earnings above that are taxed at 40%. The Universal Social Charge is 8% on earnings over €70,000.
Increased
Stay the same
Decreased
No opinion/skip
Comment:
"Ensuring that those who benefit most from our economy pay their fair share, funding our public services and protecting the public finances. We will introduce a 5% levy on individual incomes above €140,000, and remove tax credits from individual incomes above €140,000."
5 of 27 questions

Should corporation taxes be increased or decreased?

Ireland’s corporate tax rate is 12.5%, which is low by international standards. Many large companies pay a much lower rate in practice. This makes us attractive for multinationals, which are a major contributor to the economy; it has also led to accusations of Ireland being a tax haven.
Increased
Stay the same
Decreased
No opinion/skip
Comment:
"Rather than focus on increasing corporation tax, we must increase compliance rates and close the loopholes that allow massive multinationals to effectively pay no tax at all. "
6 of 27 questions

Housing and Health

Should the local property tax rates be increased or decreased?

The standard rate of LPT is 0.18% of a property’s market value. This rate can be adjusted up or down by the local authority. The revenue raised is used to fund local services and some of it is redistributed to other local authorities. LPT currently makes up less than 1% of all tax revenue.
Increased
Stay the same
Decreased
No opinion/skip
Comment:
"Abolishing the Local Property Tax, replacing it with direct Exchequer funding for local authorities. The LPT hits low and middle incomes and, for many, acts as a tax on debt as they struggle with negative equity or high mortgage interest payments"
7 of 27 questions

A rent freeze should be introduced across the country

Currently, rent increases are limited to 4% in ‘rent pressure zones’. Some argue that there should be a blanket rent freeze, so landlords could not increase rents at all for a period. Others argue that a rent freeze would drive landlords out of the sector and reduce the supply of houses for rent.
Agree
Neither agree nor disagree
Disagree
No opinion/skip
Comment:
"Sinn Féin would implement a three-year freeze on rents for all existing and new tenancies and a three-year refundable tax credit for all existing and new tenancies that would put a month’s rent back in every renter’s pocket"
8 of 27 questions

Much more resources should be directed to building local authority housing, even if that means cutting back in other areas or raising taxes

Some argue that local authority house building should be increased dramatically, as there are almost 70,000 people on waiting lists. Others favour alternative methods of solving the housing crisis, such as encouraging more private development or providing more supports for people to rent or buy.
Agree
Neither agree nor disagree
Disagree
No opinion/skip
Comment:
"Sinn Féin believes that the only way to end the housing crisis is to build public housing on public land. Public housing should be provided for those in need of social housing, affordable rental accommodation and affordable purchase homes. "
9 of 27 questions

The best solution to the housing crisis is to incentivise more building by private developers

To solve the housing crisis, some argue we need to incentivise developers to build more houses (e.g. by reducing taxes on construction or introducing harsher penalties for ‘land hording’). Others argue that the solution should instead focus on building more local authority housing.
Agree
Neither agree nor disagree
Disagree
No opinion/skip
Comment:
"For thirty years, there has been a housing policy consensus shared by Fine Gael and Fianna Fáil. Both parties, when in Government, underinvested in council housing and over relied on the private sector to deliver housing for workers and families. This has clearly failed. "
10 of 27 questions

There should be free health care for all, even those on higher incomes

Currently, only some people are entitled to a medical card or free GP care. Many people who can afford it choose to take out private health insurance. Some argue that there should be universal health care for most medical treatments, paid with public funds. Others say this would cost too much.
Agree
Neither agree nor disagree
Disagree
No opinion/skip
Comment:
"We need to build a National Health Service for all of Ireland freely available to everyone based on their health needs. An Irish NHS that values its health workers and ensures fair pay and good working conditions for all."
11 of 27 questions

Environment

What should the focus be for investment in transport?

Some say we need to reduce our dependence on cars, and invest in sustainable transport instead (e.g. buses, trains, cycling, walking). Others argue that failing to invest in our road network will damage the economy. Currently we spend more on roads than on public transport and cycleways.
Continue to prioritise investment in roads
Spread resources evenly between roads and public transport/cycle lanes
Cut spending on roads and invest significantly in public transport and cycle lanes
No opinion/skip
Comment:
"There should be a blend of increasing investment in public transport to provide real climate-friendly alternatives for commuters, expand routes, make fares more affordable and investing in local and regional roads to ensure that people in rural areas have access to safe, good-quality roads"
12 of 27 questions

New petrol and diesel vehicles should be banned in the next ten years

The draft Climate Action Bill aims to ban the sale of new fossil fuel cars from 2030 in an effort to reduce emissions. Critics say that this is unrealistic.
Agree
Neither agree nor disagree
Disagree
No opinion/skip
Comment:
"Such targets also need to be matched with public investment if they are to mean anything."
13 of 27 questions

Should carbon taxes be increased?

Carbon tax applies to fossil fuels, e.g. oil, petrol, diesel, gas. It recently increased from €20 to €26 per tonne of CO2. The Climate Change Advisory Council recommends a rapid increase (€80 per tonne by 2030). Critics say that carbon tax disproportionately impacts those on low incomes.
Increased significantly (reaching €80 per tonne by 2030)
Increased at a more moderate rate
No increases
No opinion/skip
Comment:
"The carbon tax increase will make people poorer, but it will not make the state greener or cleaner. It is a regressive tax, the sole purpose of which is to raise funds. There should be no carbon tax increases in the absence of viable alternatives"
14 of 27 questions

There should be a tax on greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture

Agriculture is a key sector in the Irish economy. It is also responsible for 33% of Ireland’s greenhouse gas emissions. Some have called for a new tax on greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture, but opponents say that would be too damaging to the agri-food industry.
Agree
Neither agree nor disagree
Disagree
No opinion/skip
Comment:
"We would ensure agriculture is sustainable. We will support farming communities so they can continue to have a livelihood while contributing to the EU 2030 climate and energy targets."
15 of 27 questions

Immigration, moral and social issues

Should immigration into Ireland be made more restrictive or less restrictive?

Non-Irish nationals make up 12.7% of the population, most of whom came from the EU. Work permits are issued to people from other countries only with a well-paid job offer in certain occupations. Some say immigration puts pressure on services; while others say it is needed to tackle job shortages.
More restrictive
Stay the same
Less restrictive
No opinion/skip
Comment:
"Every state has to have an immigration system with well-functioning rules and regulation that everyone understands and that serves the interest of the people of the country. Where we do need migrants, such as to fill vacancies in our health system, our migration system should facilitate this."
16 of 27 questions

More resources should be given to improving conditions for asylum seekers

Asylum seekers are housed in Direct Provision centres. Some argue that conditions are poor and have a negative effect on the physical and mental health of residents. Others disagree and argue that improving conditions would cost too much and could attract more asylum seekers to Ireland.
Agree
Neither agree nor disagree
Disagree
No opinion/skip
Comment:
"We should end the Direct Provision system, treat people with dignity, process applications for asylum in a timely manner and implement the recommendations of the All-Party Oireachtas Committee Report."
17 of 27 questions

The liberalisation of abortion in Ireland has gone too far

The legislation introduced after the 2018 referendum allows for terminations for any reason up to 12 weeks in a pregnancy. Terminations are only permitted after this date (and before the foetus becomes viable) if there is a serious risk to the health of the pregnant woman.
Agree
Neither agree nor disagree
Disagree
No opinion/skip
18 of 27 questions

Small towns and villages should not be forced to accommodate asylum seekers

There are approximately 6,000 asylum seekers living in Ireland. Many are accommodated in or near small towns and villages, where it is easier to find private premises to use as Direct Provision centres. In some cases locals have opposed this on the grounds that their town might be overwhelmed.
Agree
Neither agree nor disagree
Disagree
No opinion/skip
Comment:
"No community should be forced. To do so fosters resentment and creates a barrier to integration. Such accommodation must be done in consultation and co-operation with local groups and residents. However, the system must also protect people fleeing persecution and war. It is Ireland's responsibility."
19 of 27 questions

The Church has too much control over Irish schools and hospitals

The Catholic Church runs a number of private hospitals. Most primary schools & many secondary schools are under the patronage of the Church. Some say the Church provides invaluable services in health and education, while others say that a Catholic ethos is being imposed against people’s wishes.
Agree
Neither agree nor disagree
Disagree
No opinion/skip
Comment:
"Non-denominational schools should be supported and made easily accessible to parents who do no wish their children to be educated with a religious ethos. Religious ethos should never be used in publicly funded hospitals to deny the provision of maternity and abortion services. "
20 of 27 questions

Political and constitutional issues

The reunification of Ireland would create more problems than it would solve

Some people are opposed to the division of Ireland and believe that reunification should happen as soon as possible. Others disagree on the grounds that Unionists in Northern Ireland do not want it, or because they believe it would be too expensive for the Irish government.
Agree
Neither agree nor disagree
Disagree
No opinion/skip
Comment:
"The future is not about a single step-change in which we go to bed one night in a partitioned Ireland and the next morning wake up in a united Ireland. It’s all about process. "
21 of 27 questions

Irish citizens living abroad (including Northern Ireland) should have a vote in Presidential elections

A referendum on this has been proposed. Some argue that political participation should be a core aspect of citizenship, regardless of where you live. Others say that there are too many citizens living abroad, and that they may be out of touch with what is going on in Ireland.
Agree
Neither agree nor disagree
Disagree
No opinion/skip
22 of 27 questions

A referendum on Irish unity should be held during the lifetime of the next government

The Good Friday Agreement allows for a referendum in Northern Ireland & the Republic on a united Ireland, if there is evidence that unification is desired by a majority. Some say that, in light of Brexit, a border poll should be held soon. Others believe this would be premature and divisive.
Agree
Neither agree nor disagree
Disagree
No opinion/skip
Comment:
"Sinn Féin is a United Ireland party. Our core political objective is to achieve Irish Unity and the referendum on Unity which is the means to secure this. "
23 of 27 questions

The voting age should be lowered to 16

18 is the most common minimum voting age internationally, but some countries have reduced it to 16. Proponents argue that young people should have a say as it affects their future, while opponents argue that many 16-year-olds lack the maturity to vote responsibly.
Agree
Neither agree nor disagree
Disagree
No opinion/skip
24 of 27 questions

EU and international affairs

European integration has gone too far

Some people argue that the EU interferes too much in the affairs of member states, and powers should be returned to the national level. Others argue that further integration is necessary to tackle shared challenges and for economic stability.
Agree
Neither agree nor disagree
Disagree
No opinion/skip
Comment:
" Sinn Féin would ensure the State plays a positive role at European. However, we must maintain our sovereignty, particularly in the areas of agriculture, state sovereignty, democratic decision making, public procurement, workers’ rights, environmental and food safety regulations"
25 of 27 questions

Ireland should cooperate with other EU member states on defence

Ireland has recently joined the PESCO framework, which seeks to increase defence cooperation between EU states. It commits members to work together on military planning & increase defence spending. It does not create an EU army, but some oppose it because they see it as a step in that direction.
Agree
Neither agree nor disagree
Disagree
No opinion/skip
Comment:
"Sinn Féin will ensure that our neutrality is restored and seek to have it enshrined in the Constitution, thus allowing our Defence Forces to continue its important role as peacekeepers across the globe."
26 of 27 questions

Ireland should boycott Israeli goods produced in the occupied territories

A proposed law would make it an offence to import or sell goods originating in an occupied territory. Proponents say this will show solidarity with Palestinians living under Israeli occupation. Critics say it discriminates unfairly against Israel, and could undermine important links with the US.
Agree
Neither agree nor disagree
Disagree
No opinion/skip
Comment:
"The Boycott, Divestment, Sanctions movement as a peaceful means of resisting Israeli apartheid is growing around the world. Sinn Féin supported and facilitated the Occupied Territories Bill which would prohibit the import and sale of goods and services originating in illegal settlements"
27 of 27 questions